And so it begins

49 posts in this topic

Posted

Yeah, I know, but I was just afraid that I would not be able to get it back off in the future, Oh Well ...

The altitude up here is 8,300' and the current temp at almost noon is 61 degrees F. We are currently in what the locals refer to as "The Monsoons". This is the time of year when they really need all the rain they can get as they do not receive that much the rest of the year unless they have a heavy snow over the winter. John

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Posted

Hi John

Very interesting read, I also have Cazador and like you finding any service manual is impossible. All trial and error stuff with maintenance. I have saved your pics for reference and wanted to ask a few questions related to this machine. 

how do you adjust the drive chain and how tight must the wheel bearings be? I have looked and it seems the drive shaft ends have bolts but undoing them does nothing so i think the cantilever bracket just holds the drive shaft in place. All manuals online seem to be long chain type and not this short vertical one so I'm baffled. Also noticed whilst upping the shock preload that one of my rear wheels wobbled and the castellated nut was loose. I remthe cotter pin and tightened the nut and replaced the pin. no wobble now but its worrying that there are no indications of what items to check on a weekly basis. Your referal to loctite on everything has made me wonder what else could be loose etc. 

For your information I had running problems uphill and discovered air intake manifold had split, opening up when the engine tipped on its mountings under load. had swapped cdi, fuel pump, filter, battery, plug etc before finding thd source. 

Cheers for this brilliant article. 

Keyif

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Posted

Yes, I also found both of the castle nuts (the nuts that hold the rear hubs onto the axle) loose on mine as well. The sprocket hub that the chain sprocket bolts onto to drive the axle was loose as well. In looking at both of these hubs I have come to the conclusion that the material that Cazador used for these parts are not hardened steel but softer steel. I suspect the idea is that this allows for less critical tolerances and as you drive, the hubs conform to the splines on the axle as long as you keep the nuts tight. This is why the sales and owner’s manual both state to be sure to take it back to your dealer after a week to a month to have them tighten up all loose bolts and nuts. I just used my air impact wrench to tighten up the castle nuts and have been keeping an eye on them. I am also replacing a lot of the Phillips head 6mm machine screws with 6mm hex head bolts with lock washers. By using a hex head bolt, I am able to get it much tighter than I could with a Phillips screwdriver.

To tighten the chain, it is basically like the rear wheel of a motorcycle. Loosen the bolts that hold the axle bearings, loosen the rear most nut on the bolt that also connected to the wheel bearing assembly. Then, tighten the other nut so that this nut pushes against the metal bracket and in turn, pushes the axle assembly forward, I have drawn a red circle around the nut that does this task. Do each side the same number of times so that you keep the axle parallel to the front axle. I went about 3 turns of the wrench on each side checking the slack as I went. I do not know how well I explained this, but you should be able to do a search on YouTube for adjusting a motorcycle chain, the procedure is the same. If you are still having problems, write back and I will see if I can make a short video or take step—by-step pictures. I have included a picture of the assembly for reference. John

 

Rear Axle and Chain Adjustment.jpg

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Posted

A little blue locktight would not hurt either.

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Posted

That's very clear John, thanks for your time and info. Yesterday aquired some axle stands so now can raise it fully and check chain slack with wheels hanging. I will check the drive sprocket too and in general drop my socket wrench over all the nuts and bolts. There is a lot of vibration happening when going downhill between engine braking and full revs so tend to tfy and keep foot on gas to just prevent engine braking. I was apprehensive about tightening those castellated nuts but now understand its a frequent checking point. 

Also I find heading towards hills i try and get some speed up as it slows towards the top, I think it still starves of petrol after a long full throttle climb so try and get a good start. I added a pic of the buggy and hope it lasts and runs as good as it looks.

Only time will tell and I'll share my findings. 

Keyif 👍

Buggy 1.jpg

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Posted (edited)

By the way, I have not begun to post all of the pictures of my project. If you have any additional questions about anything, don't hesitate to ask. I have probably worked on that system already. About the only thing I have not gotten into (yet) is the front end suspension and removing the rear axle (that will happen this fall).

You mentioned you believe you might have a fuel starvation problem. One way to check that is to run it wide open until it starts to die. When this happens, turn the key switch off and pull over and check the fuel filter. If there is fuel in the filter, then the pump is keeping up with the engine demand and you need to look elsewhere. If it is fuel starvation, then you need to look into an upgraded fuel pump. John

PS I like your ride. Nice Wheels. I hope to upgrade mine in the future.

Edited by John7656
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Posted

Many thanks John👍

To successfully climb long hills with 2 passengers then have to keep speedo on the white section under 25mph otherwise it stumbles, however if the hills have a little chance to come off full throttle for a few seconds then this seems to stop the problem. 

What happens is steady pulling for so long then it falters, ease off the throttle a little and engine continues to run and then power returns, The rest of the time its running well. I'm thinking possibly a vapour lock as hoses are real close to the engine so I'll try cable tying them away loosely.

I will do the fuel filter check again next time it happens as that was the original problem(empty fuel filter) 

The problem was eradicated by changing the split intake manifold. Not before changing the fuel pump, filter, cdi air filter, battery and plug. So everything should be in good order now and my original thoughts of "its a scooter engine, change the oil regular and nothing to go wrong" mentality has been surely tested. haha. 

UPDATE: 15th August

Yesterday removed wheels and upped the shockers up to 3rd notch back and front so rides firmer and front wheels don't rub body on full lock, Successfuly adjusted chain but had to use rack clamp to move the axle forward as the bolts are soft and left one is almost stripped. Tightened castle nuts and also found 3 bolts on rear sprocket all loose along with a few other bolts. All checked now and now nowt gonna fall off and less noise when moving. 

Next mission is moving the cargo box up higher so as can also use the parcel tray and adjust headlights. maybe fit additional 42w LED spots to the sides above the mirrors. 

Keyif

IMG-20170723-WA0000.jpg

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Posted

Well, here is the latest in my ongoing saga.

My wife had to come back to our cabin in reverse. Turns out the forward shift cable broke and all she could do was back up.

I did not want to get a replacement from Cazador for two reasons. First, this cable only lasted about a year and a half and that does not speak well to the quality of the cable. The second is every time I have contacted Cazador parts, no one seems to know what parts fit what. They call back to service but they just say bring in your part and we will verify fit. Well, the nearest Cazador parts dealer is about 500 miles away, so that is not really an option.

Since the existing cable housing was fine, just the cable inside it was bad, I decided to see if I could make my own replacement. I started by measuring the distance between the end of the cable and the end of the housing on both ends so that I would know how far to attach the ends on the new cable (I could not trust measuring the old one as I was unsure of how long it would be due to the way the cable stretched before breaking).

Next, I took the old cable, cable housing, and a set of calipers to measure with and went shopping. I found that I could inset a 3/32” cable into the housing giving me a larger diameter cable over the original one. I then found that a 3/16” bolt would work just fine for the cable end. So I cut off the threaded and hex head ends of the bolt and drilled a small hole into one end for the cable to go through. I welded the cable onto the bolt and using a hand file, filed the excess weld down to a shape that would fit but still be strong enough to hold the cable. Satisfied that this would work, I inserted the cable into the housing and repeated the process on the other end. Here are some pictures of what I ended up with.

If I could have found a better quality cable that would fit, I would have gone that route, but I believe that this will work as well or better than the factory unit. John

 

Test Fit.jpg

Ready For Welding.jpg

Welded Up.jpg

Finished 1A.jpg

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Posted

That looks ok, was the old cable rusty, or was it just a crappy factory design.

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Posted

OMG what an amazing feat to return home in reverse. My reverse often jumps teeth on the drive chain and makes horrendous noise. She did well 👍

Looks like another bit of scrutiny is in order for mine. 

I've just finished upcycling an old clothes rail to raise the cargo box and can store gas, jump leads, Slime and pump underneath and covered with webbing to hold in place. 

Still waiting on my 72w Cree lightbar to fit in the scoop on front to finish up. 

Well done on the repair John, I remember fixing brake cables in the past and they stood up well. 

Keyif

Buggy_2.jpg

Buggy_4.jpg

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Posted

By the way. "Slime"  for your information 

I've used it on my motorbike and mountain bike and it takes away the puncture stress of thorns etc. out on trails. 

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=fKlS7I-gwW4

It says temporary but I've used it and managed to wear out my tire before needing to get it fixed. 

images (11).jpg

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Posted (edited)

That looks ok, was the old cable rusty, or was it just a crappy factory design.

It was black like it had a build up of carbon on it. I believe the factory design was OK, but the new cable has a much more positive feel to it, not as "mushy" or spongy like before. I may do the same mod to the reverse cable when I get home. I will update this thread over the weekend with a picture of the old cable. We are leaving shortly for a few days, but I would really like some feedback as to what others think happened. I have shown it to a few people here and no one has seen anything quite like it before. Later. John

OK, I promised a pic of the old cable. Here it is and while I had already cleaned a lot of the black soot/carbon/whatever, you can still see some of it on the shorter end. I had to cut off the broken end of the longer section to clean out the liner before I could install the new and larger cable. John

 

Old Broken Cable Crop.jpg

Edited by John7656
Added picture

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Posted

Keyif "My reverse often jumps teeth on the drive chain and makes horrendous noise"

If your chain is skipping teeth, then your chain is still too loose. You want a little bit of slack, but not to the point of jumping teeth. Check your tension, if it only moves no more than 1/2" (13mm) then you might be skipping a gear tooth in the transmission. We had this problem earlier when the transmission was not fully engaged in gear. I believe that this new cable will help with that issue as stated earlier that the shifting is much more positive. John

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Posted

Hi John

I normaly hold the gear lever in position as i begin to rev so i can feel it engage properly. learned this after so many missed gears.

Didn't even give a thought to 2 cables for forward and reverse..I must take a look and give them some lubrication. My chain is tight now following your instructions and using axle stands to completely raise it up on subframe. its really helped but still get the odd jump when the engine is cold and reversing up an incline so tend to avoid if at all possible.

Also as a plus it now runs 100% better and topping out at 35mph on the flat and chugging up inclines around 20mph dropping to 10mph on very steep hills. (2 passengers) 

Note:- keep a check on sprocket bolts and the 2 large nuts because mine came loose and rattled around the axle. Also tie up the fuel lines & filter well clear of the exhaust for safety. 

Keyif 👍

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Posted

Cool thread! love to see when members can help each other. :acool: 

It's what this community is all about.

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Posted

Dan, I agree with your comment about helping each other out. I knew that I would need help with the GY6 engine when I decided to go this route. The combination of your videos and reading post on this board told me that this was a site that respected others and would be willing to help out without the bashing and flaming that goes on some of the other boards; I'm too old to put up with that type of thing.

Keyif, I used to have the same issue with a fairly loud "crunch" when I shifted gear and the clutch engaged. Since I have done the shifter cable repair, I have not noticed that any more. Perhaps the smaller diameter cable is stretching too much and not allowing the gears to fully engage.

The buggy has been running fine since the shifter cable repair. Yesterday, I cut down about a 15-20 foot dead tree, cut it up into large pieces and in two trips, hauled it back to our site to cut up for firewood. We are getting close to the end of our stay in the mountains and will back home the second half of September. Over the winter, my plans are to lower the final drive ratio, finish the 1" exhaust that I got started earlier, but did not have time to complete before leaving, work on the suspension - it only has about 1/2" travel when I push down on it (I weigh 200 lbs) and work on the CVT/clutch; it currently engages at too high of RPM. This sometimes causes a rather harsh start, especially first thing in the morning.

John

PS Sorry about the run-on sentence.

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Posted

Well, it has been a while but I have been busy trying to get ready for our summer trip to the mountains. As a quick review, last summer the issues that I had were lack of power on some of the steep grades, brakes, exhaust, seats and the harsh ride. To this end, I have been able to check off some of the issues and other are still in the works. However, due to the problems that I had finding the correct brake pads for the rear brake, I decided to go ahead and post what I have done so far that perhaps it will save someone else the headache of finding the correct pads.

So I will start off with the brakes. I have had great difficulty in finding the correct pads for this UTV. The problem is with the smaller inner pad. Most of the pads that are out there are 48mm across the widest point (tabs) and mine is 55mm and no one seems to have them. I even went to two different Cazador dealers and both said they had them until I got there and they could not match my pad. So once again, I got on the internet but this time my search came up with a site Parts Unlimited http://www.parts-unlimited.com/products/?productId=432531&partNumber=17211558 and they had a drawing with the dimensions of their pads and after verifying against mine, I discovered that among the various vehicles this fits, the most recent one is a Kawasaki KEF300B Lakota Sport. However, they only sell to dealers but I now knew what to look for. So with a quick search I bought a set and they fit perfectly, finally, I found the correct item. Keyif, make a note of this.

The next item was rear sprocket. Last year I tried but was unsuccessful in locating a 37 tooth rear sprocket (or anything even close to it) that would fit on my axle hub. So I have made a two piece adapter that will take a JTR473.37 sprocket to my existing 3-bolt hub. I chose this sprocket for several reasons. First off, my UTV utilizes a 520 chain and I wanted to stay with that size. Next, I needed a sprocket that would allow me to fabricate some type of adapter to go between my hub and the new sprocket. Finally, I wanted a sprocket that would be a “family” of sprockets so that if this size does not work out, there are others sizes but will still have the same hub and bolt size / pattern. This one seemed to do the best job of fulfilling all of the requirements. So basically, I made two “spacers” if you will out of .250” steel plate (same width as the sprocket). The first one sits onto the axle hub and the OD is the size of the ID of the new sprocket. This centers the sprocket on the axle and keeps it in the same plane as the output shaft’s sprocket. The second one still fits onto the hub, but is larger in diameter and bolts the sprocket to the hub. Actually, both adapters are bolted onto the hub, but the first one just basically keeps the sprocket centered while the second one transfers the rotational force from the chain to the axle.

While I had the axle out for the adapters, I noticed that the adjusters had some of the threads stripped (both of them). These adjusters were made out of some very soft steel and I had intended to make some new ones a while back. This time, I decided that now was the time to do this. These new ones are made from 1/8” plate and I am using 3/i8” bolts for the threaded rods. I think that these will hold up.

I am currently working on the suspension and will update this thread when I get through. John

 

Adapter For New Sprocket.jpg

New 37 Tooth Sprocket.jpg

New Rear Axle Adjuster.jpg

New vs Old Axle Adjuster.jpg

Rear Brake Pads.jpg

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Posted

Great info and post John

Keep us updated how this all works out at altitude..

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Posted (edited)

Hi John

      Lovely update and I've taken note of the brakepad part numbers. thanks for sharing. 

     I have also the same problem with the chain adjusters with stripped threads. I managed to take up the slack by using a clamp to move the pivoting assembly and snugged up the nuts once in position. Only a quick fix I'm afraid and will need to buy or make similar parts in the future. Your a dab hand with a welder. brilliant.

     I've replaced the front tyres and found the tyres were grossly over inflated when purchased giving choppy ride and wearing centre treads out prematurely. I'm now running on just 6psi back and front tyres and a softer ride and no impact on steering. They started with the 25psi and I dropped down in stages checking how much tread touched ground and any deflection in tyre walls. Seems to have also reduced vibration too.

       I'm glad I installed the light bar as its awesome when riding dark lanes, and I did same and raised drivers seat to enable rewiring and adding a fusebox and 2nd Battery (temporarily covered with a plastic bag).

 I've also added 2 switches, one to isolate extra lamps, mp3 player and aux. the other to disconnect 2nd battery. This is just used when starting and serves as a spare because if battery runs flat then speedo, lights and everything goes off and it will not start or run at all. Even when jump leads used it starts but won't run long enough to get home.

        A new starter motor has been fitted and this has alleviated the clicking and starting problem. mind you it does run rough after heavy rain and this must be moisture in the electrical parts, I had this years ago with a Suzuki trail bike and damp start spray cured that.. I can't locate any here so its a purchase from UK on my next visit.

     Also John, we recently we had very strong winds and had to chock the back wheels as the hand brake failed to hold it still and begs me to ask how you manage to use your winch as there's no real weight in the buggy? Plus if and how often do you grease your wheel bearings? 

Keyif 

posted_4.jpg

posted 1.jpg

posted_3.jpg

posted 2.jpg

posted 7.jpg

posted_5.jpg

posted_6.jpg

Edited by keyif

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Posted

Keyif, I use a big rock to chock (hold in place) the wheels when using the winch. I have an idea for adding a separate manual disc brake to the existing rear brake to give added holding power to the parking brake. However, with everything else, I am not sure I will have time to do that this year before mid-May. I haven't checked the wheel bearings yet and I am sure I need to. Thanks for the reminder, one more thing added to my to-do list. John

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Posted

Well, it has been a while but I have been busy trying to get ready for our summer trip to the mountains. As a quick review, last summer the issues that I had were lack of power on some of the steep grades, brakes, exhaust, seats and the harsh ride. To this end, I have been able to check off some of the issues and other are still in the works. However, due to the problems that I had finding the correct brake pads for the rear brake, I decided to go ahead and post what I have done so far that perhaps it will save someone else the headache of finding the correct pads.

So I will start off with the brakes. I have had great difficulty in finding the correct pads for this UTV. The problem is with the smaller inner pad. Most of the pads that are out there are 48mm across the widest point (tabs) and mine is 55mm and no one seems to have them. I even went to two different Cazador dealers and both said they had them until I got there and they could not match my pad. So once again, I got on the internet but this time my search came up with a site Parts Unlimited http://www.parts-unlimited.com/products/?productId=432531&partNumber=17211558 and they had a drawing with the dimensions of their pads and after verifying against mine, I discovered that among the various vehicles this fits, the most recent one is a Kawasaki KEF300B Lakota Sport. However, they only sell to dealers but I now knew what to look for. So with a quick search I bought a set and they fit perfectly, finally, I found the correct item. Keyif, make a note of this.

The next item was rear sprocket. Last year I tried but was unsuccessful in locating a 37 tooth rear sprocket (or anything even close to it) that would fit on my axle hub. So I have made a two piece adapter that will take a JTR473.37 sprocket to my existing 3-bolt hub. I chose this sprocket for several reasons. First off, my UTV utilizes a 520 chain and I wanted to stay with that size. Next, I needed a sprocket that would allow me to fabricate some type of adapter to go between my hub and the new sprocket. Finally, I wanted a sprocket that would be a “family” of sprockets so that if this size does not work out, there are others sizes but will still have the same hub and bolt size / pattern. This one seemed to do the best job of fulfilling all of the requirements. So basically, I made two “spacers” if you will out of .250” steel plate (same width as the sprocket). The first one sits onto the axle hub and the OD is the size of the ID of the new sprocket. This centers the sprocket on the axle and keeps it in the same plane as the output shaft’s sprocket. The second one still fits onto the hub, but is larger in diameter and bolts the sprocket to the hub. Actually, both adapters are bolted onto the hub, but the first one just basically keeps the sprocket centered while the second one transfers the rotational force from the chain to the axle.

While I had the axle out for the adapters, I noticed that the adjusters had some of the threads stripped (both of them). These adjusters were made out of some very soft steel and I had intended to make some new ones a while back. This time, I decided that now was the time to do this. These new ones are made from 1/8” plate and I am using 3/i8” bolts for the threaded rods. I think that these will hold up.

I am currently working on the suspension and will update this thread when I get through. John

 

Adapter For New Sprocket.jpg

New 37 Tooth Sprocket.jpg

This is pretty much what I did with my Carbide. I used the JTR273.39 and drilled my own holes for the driven. I use the JTF569 family for the driver. Being able to switch out drivers in 5 minutes is quite the luxury!

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Posted

Thanks John

 I've made notes for future reference. At the moment its just the adjusters that need replacing as too soft and hence my chain is too slack. This can jump under load so will have to address this very soon and give the chain a good soaking as the links don't lay properly on the sprockets. Did you manage to remove the adjusters without a stripdown of the axle and also did you find the pivot all ceased together even loosening the bolts on the pivots. I take it you didn't buy new ones because of inferior materials. 

regards Keyif

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Posted

Replacing the adjusters is easy. Just loosen and  remove the bottom bolt that holds the adjuster, remove the adjuster and install the new one. I did not have any problems with removing the bolts on mine, but yours may be different. In thinking of a replacement, if you do not have or have access to the equipment to make a new (and better) adjuster, you might take your old one to a motorcycle shop and see if you can find a replacement that will work. Since the ones that I made used a larger bolt, I had to drill out the mount on the swing axle, but it really was a simple job to swap them out. One thing to keep in mind. If you look carefully, you will see that the bolt is offset or angled away from the bolt on the bearing housing. Again, if you are trying to find a replacement, be sure to take the old one and compare it to whatever you are looking at. John

New_Rear_Axle_Adjuster.thumb.jpg.242b2a5

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Posted

I am overdue for this update but at last, here it is. My goals from last year were primarily two major items; improve the ride and more lower end power. I am happy to report that I believe I have accomplished both of those goals.

The first item I dealt with was the poor power at high altitude. As previously posted, after doing a lot of research on options and “best guesstimate”, I decided to change out the rear 32 tooth sprocket to a 37 tooth sprocket. This translates to a 15.6% increase of the mechanical advantage over the stock ratio. This involved making an adapter to accommodate the sprocket I chose to the hub that was on the axle. The end result was a much improved start (not as sudden and with a substantial jerk) and I believe adequate power to deal with the inclines that are present in the mountains where we use this UTV.

The second item was the extremely harsh ride. With the original coil over shocks that were on the UTV, I had at best, ½” travel with me pushing down on either the front or rear end (I am basically 200 lbs). I was having trouble deciding whether to go with air or coil suspension and in the end, I did both. I started with some 400mm coilover ATV/UTV shocks. These worked well on the front end, but I really needed 450mm shocks and I could not find anything suitable for this application. So I ended up making some adapters to go from the lower A-arm to the bottom of the coilover and this works fine. Since I had the adapter issue to deal with on the front, I decided to go with air shocks on the rear for that reason and I knew I would be carrying a greater load on the rear set. After do a lot of research on different Monroe air shocks, I went with Monroe MA812 shocks. I had to expand the shock mounts on the UTV from 1.25” to 1.3125” (expand the mount by 1/16”) and make a stainless steel bushing to go inside the rubber grommet on the shock to the 12mm bolt. I had a lot of difficulty getting the system air tight and ended up replacing most of the push-to-connect connectors to plastic tubing compression fittings. After much trial and error, I finally got the system to seal. Initial test runs indicate that this should work, but either accelerating or breaking causes a fair amount of travel on the rear of the UTV and this may require additional “tweaking” in the future, to be continued.

Rear_Air_Shock.thumb.JPG.d0ad5236e2703e2

Front Shock Upper Mount.jpg

Air Pump Control Panel.JPG

Air Pump Location.JPG

Front Shock Lower Mount Bracket.JPG

Tach and Air Gauge.JPG

Monroe MA812 Air Shock.jpg

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